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Patent : An Introduction

  Patent is an exclusive right granted by the government to innovators for a limited period of time against the full disclosure of the invention. The main objective of patent law is to promote...

What is patent?

Patent is an exclusive right granted by the government to innovators for a limited period of time against the full disclosure of the invention.The main objective of patent law is to promote knowledge sharing by providing opportunities to the innovator to recover the investment incurred and to earn profit. Such knowledge sharing contributes to an overall scientific and technological development by enabling others to use the patented invention for carrying out further research and to use it freely after the expiry of patent term. Similarly, the opportunities to the innovator to recover the investment incurred and to earn profit serves a motivating factor for the innovators. Thus, the ultimate objective of the patent law is raising standard of living by promoting scientific and technological development.

A few months back, a Single Judge bench of the Bombay High Court delivered what has now been revealed to be a very problematic decision on deceptive similarity in alcoholic beverage trademarks. Brought to light upon being set aside by the Division Bench, this decision rendered findings that threatened to set dangerous precedents on what constitutes a trademark, and how deceptive similarity is evaluated. In this post, I revisit the Single Judge’s ruling and underscore the ways in which the Division Bench corrects the approach.
A few months back, a Single Judge bench of the Bombay High Court delivered what has now been revealed to be a very problematic decision on deceptive similarity in alcoholic beverage trademarks. Brought to light upon being set aside by the Division Bench, this decision rendered findings that threatened to set dangerous precedents on what constitutes a trademark, and how deceptive similarity is evaluated. In this post, I revisit the Single Judge’s ruling and underscore the ways in which the Division Bench corrects the approach.
A few months back, a Single Judge bench of the Bombay High Court delivered what has now been revealed to be a very problematic decision on deceptive similarity in alcoholic beverage trademarks. Brought to light upon being set aside by the Division Bench, this decision rendered findings that threatened to set dangerous precedents on what constitutes a trademark, and how deceptive similarity is evaluated. In this post, I revisit the Single Judge’s ruling and underscore the ways in which the Division Bench corrects the approach.
A few months back, a Single Judge bench of the Bombay High Court delivered what has now been revealed to be a very problematic decision on deceptive similarity in alcoholic beverage trademarks. Brought to light upon being set aside by the Division Bench, this decision rendered findings that threatened to set dangerous precedents on what constitutes a trademark, and how deceptive similarity is evaluated. In this post, I revisit the Single Judge’s ruling and underscore the ways in which the Division Bench corrects the approach.
A few months back, a Single Judge bench of the Bombay High Court delivered what has now been revealed to be a very problematic decision on deceptive similarity in alcoholic beverage trademarks. Brought to light upon being set aside by the Division Bench, this decision rendered findings that threatened to set dangerous precedents on what constitutes a trademark, and how deceptive similarity is evaluated. In this post, I revisit the Single Judge’s ruling and underscore the ways in which the Division Bench corrects the approach.

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