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A few months back, a Single Judge bench of the Bombay High Court delivered what has now been revealed to be a very problematic decision on deceptive similarity in alcoholic beverage trademarks. Brought to light upon being set aside by the Division Bench, this decision rendered findings that threatened to set dangerous precedents on what constitutes a trademark, and how deceptive similarity is evaluated. In this post, I revisit the Single Judge’s ruling and underscore the ways in which the Division Bench corrects the approach.

 

A few months back, a Single Judge bench of the Bombay High Court delivered what has now been revealed to be a very problematic decision on deceptive similarity in alcoholic beverage trademarks. Brought to light upon being set aside by the Division Bench, this decision rendered findings that threatened to set dangerous precedents on what constitutes a trademark, and how deceptive similarity is evaluated. In this post, I revisit the Single Judge’s ruling and underscore the ways in which the Division Bench corrects the approach.
A few months back, a Single Judge bench of the Bombay High Court delivered what has now been revealed to be a very problematic decision on deceptive similarity in alcoholic beverage trademarks. Brought to light upon being set aside by the Division Bench, this decision rendered findings that threatened to set dangerous precedents on what constitutes a trademark, and how deceptive similarity is evaluated. In this post, I revisit the Single Judge’s ruling and underscore the ways in which the Division Bench corrects the approach.
A few months back, a Single Judge bench of the Bombay High Court delivered what has now been revealed to be a very problematic decision on deceptive similarity in alcoholic beverage trademarks. Brought to light upon being set aside by the Division Bench, this decision rendered findings that threatened to set dangerous precedents on what constitutes a trademark, and how deceptive similarity is evaluated. In this post, I revisit the Single Judge’s ruling and underscore the ways in which the Division Bench corrects the approach.
A few months back, a Single Judge bench of the Bombay High Court delivered what has now been revealed to be a very problematic decision on deceptive similarity in alcoholic beverage trademarks. Brought to light upon being set aside by the Division Bench, this decision rendered findings that threatened to set dangerous precedents on what constitutes a trademark, and how deceptive similarity is evaluated. In this post, I revisit the Single Judge’s ruling and underscore the ways in which the Division Bench corrects the approach.
A few months back, a Single Judge bench of the Bombay High Court delivered what has now been revealed to be a very problematic decision on deceptive similarity in alcoholic beverage trademarks. Brought to light upon being set aside by the Division Bench, this decision rendered findings that threatened to set dangerous precedents on what constitutes a trademark, and how deceptive similarity is evaluated. In this post, I revisit the Single Judge’s ruling and underscore the ways in which the Division Bench corrects the approach.
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